Lot # 130: 1952 World Series Game 7 Ebbets Field Ticket Stub - Billy Martin's Famous Catch - Deciding Game

Category: Baseball Tickets

Starting Bid: $200.00

Bids: 13 (Bid History)

Time Left: Auction closed
Lot / Auction Closed




This lot is closed. Bidding is not allowed.

Item was in Auction "Fall, 2022 - 10th Anniversary Auction",
which ran from 11/6/2022 12:00 PM to
11/26/2022 9:00 PM



This ticket stub is one of a complete run of stubs from every New York Yankees/Brooklyn Dodgers World Series game being offered in this auction.  We invite you to view our printed catalog or visit our e-book catalog online at https://online.flippingbook.com/view/961320424/ to read an excellent article on the crosstown rivalry written by SABR president Mark Armour.

The 1952 World Series featured the 95-59 New York Yankees, seeking to win their fourth consecutive World Series, squaring off against the 96-57-2 Brooklyn Dodgers, the fourth time the crosstown rivals would face each other for the Championship.  A see-saw Series, the teams entered the decisive seventh game after trading wins and losses for the previous six, each team winning alternate games.  The teams would head to Ebbets Field for the final game, Joe Black and Eddie Lopat squaring off against one another.  Black, who became the first African-American player to win a World Series game with his Game 1 start, would be starting his third game in seven days.  

Much like the Series, the game was see-saw beginning in the fourth inning, each team putting a run on the board in their half of the fourth and fifth until Mickey Mantle's sixth inning home run put the Yankees up by a run, 3-2.  In the bottom of the frame, Yankees pitcher Vic Raschi, the third Yankees pitcher of the day, would load the bases with one out, prompting Casey Stengel to bring in pitcher Bob Kuzava.  Kuzava retired Duke Snider on a soft popup to third base, bringing Jackie Robinson to the plate. With the runners going, Robinson popped up to the right side of the mound, freezing Kuzava.  Yankees second baseman Billy Martin raced in from deep second and made a shoestring catch, saving at least two runs and ending the inning.  It would prove to be the decisive play, as the Yankees would add one run in the 7th and win the game, 4-2.  Many would call it the most important play of Martin's career, the one that would solidify his reputation as a hard-nosed, hustling player.  He would, of course, play three more seasons with the Yankees, and would return to manage (parts of) eight different seasons with the team, becoming one of the team's most beloved figures.

This outstanding stub displays light wear consistent with the VG-EX grade assigned by PSA.  An outstanding example from the decisive game of the 1952 Series, a legendary game in Yankees lore.

 

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