Lot # 212: 1891 Conly Studios Boston Red Stockings Tom Brown

Category: 19th Century

Starting Bid: $50.00

Bids: 8 (Bid History)

Time Left: Auction closed
Lot / Auction Closed




This lot is closed. Bidding is not allowed.

Item was in Auction "Fall, 2021 Premier Auction",
which ran from 11/8/2021 12:00 AM to
11/27/2021 9:00 PM



Significant studio cabinet photo from a rare issue, produced by the prominent Conly Photographic Studios of Boston.  Each of the photos in the set depicts a member of the 1891 Boston Red Stockings, who won the championship of the American Association in the league's final season.  There are less than a dozen known subjects from the issue (eight of them are included in this auction), though it is likely that additional players were originally included).  The cabinets each feature a sepia-tone photo of the player in street clothes, the photographer's name and city printed at the bottom of the mount with the player's name neatly written in fountain pen in-between.  The reverse features an ornate and elaborate advertisement for the studio on the reverse.

The reverse of each card in the collection we are offering has, with exceptions noted in the individual descriptions, glue staining around the perimeter of the mount, with a number written on the reverse of each card (a different number on each).  It has been theorized that the photos were once mounted to a larger display, perhaps designed to create a larger photo composite or other display.  The numbers serve as an indication that additional subjects were initially included (the highest number included in the group is 12).

POOR condition cabinet featuring outfielder Tom Brown, who batted .321 with the 1891 Red Stockings, hitting 21 triples, scoring 177 runs.  The image is stained almost beyond recognition, the imprint of the player name and studio still visible despite the paper loss.  Significant paper remnants are evident on the reverse, with a large area of paper loss along the right edge.  Paper from the mount is quite brittle and flaking away upon contact (keep it in its mylar sleeve).  Despite the obvious wear, a historically significant and likely one of a kind photo.

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